Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
STATION
CSPAN 9
CSPAN2 7
LINKTV 6
KQED (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 34
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
to replenish endangered fish stocks by setting limits on how much each eu state can catch of what kind of fish, but there's fierce debate over those quotas every year, and there are some types of fish that are not covered by fishing regulations at all -- scallops, for example. the eu says that since shellfish do not migrate, it is up to countries like britain and france to decide for themselves what is sustainable, but now it seems a scallop war is brewing in the english channel of mid resentment over who fishes what and where. >> this coastal town in southwest england has been provided for by fishing. out at sea, the crew of this trawler had a confrontation with french fisherman staking a claim to the scallop beds. captain smith was quite shaken by the experience. >> especially monday morning, 8:00, it all kicked off. i was woken up to be told we were surrounded by french trawlers. it was definitely a premeditated attack. >> the french fisherman film the altercation -- the french fishermen. in total, 40 french trawlers surrounded the five british ones. the standoff threatens to tear out of co
for the british people to say whether they want to be in the eu or out. some were quick to criticize the move, saying it could block future risk. our correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last, david cameron delivered his speech on europe. he began with a repeat of what has gone wrong. the ever closer eu integration, a more flexible approach from what is required. >> if we do not address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail, and the british people will drift toward the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success, and i want the relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. >> the prime minister said the main problem with the growing gap between the european union and those is the there was resentment about rules and regulations. >> countries are different. they make different choices. we cannot harmonize everything. >> the solution, he said, was to try to claw back some power from the eu, and then when that was done, put it to the people. >> when we negotiate that new settlements, we will
of a couple in the last year to syria when the e.u.'s embargo changed, the provisions of that changed and so, i think those are advantages. >> thank you. >> mike gates. >> can you confirm in the case of an agreement between the u.k. and another government perhaps some kind of defense cooperation that doesn't have the same status as the, where we are talking about restrictions or controls on the arms exports that are purchased from british companies or exported from this country? in other words, if the mod decides to transfer equipment to another state that wouldn't be subjected to the same criteria as would apply with regards to the armed export regime? . . >> if you have further information; that would be helpful. okay. that's fine. can i ask you about the review as regards the workload that you referred to for ministers, the number of items for consideration: you said thorough overseeing of ministers went up 235 this year compared to 153 last year and 39 in the previous year before your middle east and north africa review. >> right. >> this is presumably dealt with by the human rights sect
in the election. >> i talk about this a lot, i consider myself a tpepl tph*eus, but when i watched what went on during the election and the way mitt romney was treated and the hypocrisy where the binders full of women was really ridiculed, an was treated like he was a massage tph*eus, basically and you see a picture like this with president obama, and you have the left basically making excuses for him. ruth marcus wrote something saying, it's bad but it's not an outrage. it's an outrage if it's a republican. i think this is why when they survey women and ask you do you consider a tpepl tph*eu a tpepl inch tph*eus, most women say no. martha: they don't like the implications that go along witness. let's take a look at some of the numbers here, there is a comparison of how presidents have done in terms of gender equality. i guess for lack of a better phrase. women in the cabinet, president obama so far has nine through the first term. president bush had ten total. bill clinton had 17 total. but what i was struck by, and as a woman i don't like these numbers comparison, to me it's like you don't
african forces. >> germany has also offered transport aircraft. the eu is sending military trainers, but time is of the essence if the west is to prevent it from falling into the hands of the radical jihad is. >> on to business news now, the german economy contracted in the final quarter of last year as the eurozone crisis took its toll, but europe's biggest economy still managed to post modest growth of 0.7%. >> that may not sound like much, but it is more than you expect from most eurozone economies. >> the eurozone crisis has not been able to dampen the mood among eurozone consumers. they are still hitting shops and helping the economy grow modestly. >> despite big increases in the cost of energy, raw materials, and oil, private consumption is up. that is the first reason. the second is that the german economy remained competitive last year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment
of the eu poverty categories. india has officially made a protest to pakistan after two soldiers were killed in kashmir. the army says pakistani troops calls -- crossed a line of control, entering indian territory and poppa stein denied the accusation as propaganda -- pakistan deny the accusations as propaganda. >> in southeastern australia, firefighters are battling nearly 200 bushfires as hundreds of people have been forced to leave their homes. one family who escaped the blaze that destroyed their home by hiding under a jetty, and they watched as several of their neighbors' houses burned down. the town in tasmania is one of the worst affected by the fires. andrew thomas has more. >> firefighters are racing to and through the latest blaze before it could get out of control. more than 150 wildfires raged in a study overnight and into wednesday morning. given the extent of the fires, in the worst conditions australia has had in many years, damage to buildings was remarkably light. this historic house in the southern state of victoria was the exception rather than the roll. although daylight
can be taken out of his position. >> we are seeing a lot of military maneuvers by the u.s. and e.u. in terms of moving arsenals to the turkish border region of syria. >> maybe these are the anti- missile defenses. i am not aware of a large contingency of people moving their to suggest there is an idea of intervention. it does not seem like intervention is on the radar. >> we will leave it there. thank you for joining us. pakistan says indian troops have killed a soldier in the disputed region. two sides exchanged fire across the line of control that is an internationally recognized border. india is accusing them of violating the cease-fire. the u.s. drone strike killed 16 people in northern pakistan. it comes days after another drought attack killed a top rebel leader in the area. pakistani intelligence officers say. taliban hideouts were targeted on sunday. >> according to reports, u.s. drone strikes on at least three different targets in the tribal territory leaves at least 16 people killed on the ground after 10 missiles were fired by the drones operating over the territory. in
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
, it is now the e.u. state that is coming up to the first of march deadline of the current e.u. whether they will want to amend that in any way. it could be amended to apply to the regime and not to the opposition forces but it could be amended in many other ways. as a that would require the agreement of all of the states. >> in the syrian opposition i'm interested to know if that could be linked but not lethal. how serious is this embargo and is it possible for example the communications equipment that could be used in conjunction with turkey and some other countries to the elements in your possession. >> well, it's not military. it's certainly not legal. the systems so far include some things like the deployment on the stabilization defense to work with the opposition on the future plans and how they are getting help for people's basic needs and oppositions and training the citizens. we are providing each other actable material in the kits and generators to help civilians in opposition the communications equipment to help activists overcome the communications, blackouts, blockages pro
in brussels, the e.u. expressed its solidarity with mali and support for france's action. >> there were a number of countries who made it very clear to france they would be willing to help and support france in every way and did not rule in or rule out any aspect of that including military support. >> the conflict in northern mali has displaced hundreds of thousands of people in the last year. many more have left their homes since the french offensive begun. occupation in the military offensive in mali continue to increase and the humanitarian situation in the country dwindled. they now say they rescued two million to deal with the crisis, one bound to get worse as the military offensive gets underway. al jazeera, mali. >> the u.s. has formally recognized somalia's government after 20 years. somali president said made the announcement alongside secretary of state hillary clinton in washington. >> somalia is part of the commission on the community and part of the world. somali and the united states are a model for democracy of the freedom of people, of the development of the human and th
the e.u. to impose sanctions on hezbollah, and you have been a believer that we should not do it alone, we should do with unilateral. what we do take the chance and urged the european union to sanction has a lot? is we shouldn insurer swer not be writing lesser proof, i think the president is the appropriate official. >> and congress has no interest in whether the e.u. would be sanctioned as a terrorist or a station? >> the congress has a responsibility in a lot of things. >> that me ask you this about the iranian revolutionary guard. he said a minute ago you think they are a terrorist recession. do you agree? bailout yes. >> and you voted against the amendment designating them as a terrorist organization because they are recognized as a state? iran, you would not want to designate the army of a recognized as a terrorist? >> i just clarify a statement on iran being a recognized nation by the nine nations, by most world bodies. the reason why i did not vote as 22 other members that because i think jim webb's argument was a strong argument, and that is we have -- and this is what he said
a strong u.k. and a strong e.u. so i'm wondering what the white house makes of the announcement today that there will be a referendum on that issue and what the united states has at stake in the u.k. staying part of the e.u. >> we welcome the prime minister's call for britain to remain in the e.u. and to retain a leading role in europe's institutions and as the president told the prime minister when they spoke last week, the united states values a strong united kingdom and a strong european union. we value our central relationship with the u.k. as well as our relationship with the european union which makes critical contributions to peace, prosperity and security in europe and around the world. we believe that the united kingdom is stronger as a result of its european union's membership and we believe the european union is stronger as a result of having the united kingdom in the e.u. so that's -- our views on this are very clear. the internal process by which these matters are considered within the u.k. or any other country are obviously the province of those countries and those gover
, the eu are still our enemy. you should sign the paper you never leave sudan, never travel out of sudan, and never [indiscernible] and i did not. >> he refused? >> i refused to sign it. >> we still on the hunger strike? >> yes. >> they put in a feeding tube for you? >> [indiscernible] after i arrived in the sudan hospital. >> the ticket onto an airplane at guantanamo? they put you on a plane on guantanamo? >> yes. me and to the people from sudan -- two people from sudan. >> did they put back on your head? >> people from afghanistan. they took us from guantanamo and landing in baghdad, iraq. then they changed the aircraft and set me to sudan. we had another guy from morocco to sudan. >> when you landed in khartoum, was your family there? >> my family at that time was in doha, but they came to me. when i came to sudan, because i sat too long, but did not understand where i was. i did not feel anything. i opened my eyes and i find myself in the hospital in sudan. after five or six years, my wife and my son. >> did you recognize your son? >> of course. of course. by feeling, not by his face
with them in ireland where i met with a distinct lack of enthusiasm from the e.u.'s group and the independent demigs on banking. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has criticized the u.k. coalition government for backing away from his original proposal while the recent report summarizing the responses received from the report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating they welcome the group's analysis but argued that a compelling case of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulaer to community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh and the financial industry and harmful to marks, i think it's a clear sign it's time to take a step back and re-evaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or like then proposal, even if all the most visitry olic allegations wall street
123450eu6789. >> schieffer: you're favoring getting out of there. >> the quicker the better. >> schieffer: should we leave a residual force there of some kind. >> bob i would think i've been there twice now as a governor and as a u.s. senator and i believe we have some strategic especially the force base. that's a tremendous opportunity strategic point for us to launch from to protect our troops for our special forces to operate out of. i would did he ever to the experts -- defer to the experts and professionals on that. we have this war on terror not just from our generation but our children's and grandchildren's. we have to be able to strike at terror before it strikes us. >> schieffer: i don't think there's any question we have denied al-qaeda a save haven in afghanistan but they now have a safe haven in pakistan. what do we do with pakistani. >> i approve of the jones strikes there. i'm one that says we should use all the technology we have to protect america and americans without putting them in harm's way. that's been very effective. we've been able to strike and tak
a positive or more negatively? >> pakistan sees a positive role for the eu, united states, other organizations, international organizations. but what is the role that nader sees for itself? is it military when we talk about nato? or is it economic? or is it political? i think nato doesn't appear to where so many hats. basically, when we talk about nato we're talking about military. well, that i think has already been discussed. but certainly the eu, other organizations, the united states, really has very important political role, economic role. i think afghanistan -- i think nader can also help support the iran army to do a better job with its resources. so we are in favor of that, this kind of role. there was one mentioned about india and transatlantic trade comments it appeared that also comes -- there are so may things that can be done if only the conflicts situation gets resolved, and also in the border area with pakistan. >> ambassador jawad, nato's will? >> yes, particularly i think your question was on nato's role through northern afghanistan. i think this is a key importa
proposal, set forth by the uk independent commission on banking and the eu's group. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has argued criticized the coalition government and the backing away from his original proposal. while the european commission's recent report summarizes the responses received and it acknowledges the widespread opposition of a proposal in a determinedly understated action. it argues that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt that the proposal is not backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for thorough impact assessment. with all due respect my to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, what a regulatory proposal is used within the eu, considered too harsh on the financial industry and harmful to markets, it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens respect to the proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations set forth are true, even if our financial giants act solely and ruthlessly out of self
, but we now find that the eu court of justice is hindering progress by bringing into question the validity of the patents protecting research. on behalf of the millions of people in this country who suffer from long-term medical conditions, will the prime minister do what he can to clear this blockage? >> my honorable friend makes an extremely serious point. i will look closely at it, because i think this country has a competitive advantage from our having taken difficult decisions about stem cell research. it is important that we continue to lead in that area -- not only, as my honorable friend says, for economic and scientific reasons, but because we want to make sure that for people with long-term and debilitating conditions, for children with disabilities and other concerns, we crack those problems for the future. without that level of research, i do not believe that we shall. i will look very carefully at what my honorable friend has said and i will write to him with an answer. >> is the prime minister proud of the growth of food banks across this country, including in my constituency
to -- ountries that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure -- in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. -- you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. -- hoping that that maxim that politics ends at the water's edge was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was "what difference a
that aspire to ascendancy in the eu. progress there will continue american leadership. i hope we will continue to work again to the region to ensure they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. thank you for your leadership of the european foreign subcommittee. i look forward to working with a. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement in response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience. i would've enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i will enjoy working with you as secretary of state. these are complex issues, these are dangerous times. i grew up helping politics at the water's edge and was true. i believe we share the same goals. we want a secure, prosperous america. i think that starts being open and honest with each other. i hate to go back to yesterday's news and by yesterday when i was asking a relatively simple question, secretary clinton's reaction was i think it makes a big difference. i think it matters a great deal at the american people get the truth. i think they have the right to be told the
. you made a great point here, it is highly contagious, it's more contagious than the tphrao*eu. another thing it has in common with the flu is it changes rapidly it mutates. this year's strain is not the same as last year's strain. when you have a new strain you get twice as many cases. this is a very problematic thing. it's going to spread all over the country. i want the people out there to distinguish the symptoms. if you're feeling the vomiting, nausea, the diarrhea this is the n o noro virus. bill: you say it starts in utah. >> it's having huge out breaks in nursing homes and churches in utah. my guess is that somebody flew over from england or wales to utah bringing it there. plane flights spreads this incredibly rapidly. bill: if that is the case you have to wash your hands, man, that is your defense number one is it not? >> right, the flu is the respiratory virus. this one you get by touching sur tpaes, eac surfaces, touching food, you need to stay away from people when you're actually sick with this. bill: keep the fingertips out of your eyes. you see people doing that, that is
kerry would be a very effect t*eu secretary of state because he could carry out president obama's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to te
pleated, we still have those countries that aspear to ascend ancy into the e.u. i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership. i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. i just want to thank you for your leadership of the european affairs subcommittee you've done a tremendous job working on it and i look forward to working with you. >> senator kerry, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your global experience, your depth of knowledge in these areas. i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee and i'm going to enjoy working with you as secretary of state. as you said, these are complex issues and these are dangerous times. i certainly grew up hoping that that maxim of politics ends at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was but it's something to aspear to. we have the same goals, we want a prosperous and secure am
leverage the market. there has been some talks about a u.s.-eu partnership. i do not know if that can become reality. we need to think about not creating a threat where there is not one. understand carefully where we can find the basis of better cooperation. i want someone saying, kerry has a mistaken notion of what china is doing. i am not saying you do not have to be careful and understand where it is going. i am not talking about retreating from our current levels. i am trying to think about how we do this in a way that does not create the reaction you do not want to create. >> senator mccain. >> your 29 years of service is a great example for those of us newcomers. i thank you for that. in the opening round of russian --assurance, we raised issues about the western hemisphere. i worry that our firm -- our foreign policy has been very oriented east-west. the north-south access is important. i worry about the chinese being all over the americas. in a time -- we could see our influenzae road. i hope that the state department has that north-south access as they keep focus. your openin
and to the e.u., and i would just urge you that further progress in that area is going to continue to require american leadership, and i hope that we will continue to work in the region to ensure that they continue to make progress. >> we will, senator. and i just want to thank you for your leadership of the subcommittee. you've been absolutely terrific and i look forward to working with you. thanks. >> senator johnson. >> thank you, mr. chairman. senator, i appreciate your thoughtful opening statement and your thoughtful response to these questions. i have a great deal of respect for your level of experience, your knowledge in these areas and i would have enjoyed working with you as a member of the committee. i'm going to enjoy working with you as the secretary of state and i mean that in all sincerity. i want to have a close working relationship. as used in your opening statement, these are complex times. you know, i sort of grew up hoping that that maximum of politics at the water's edge was actually true. i'm not sure it ever was, but i think it's something we can aspire to. i truly think
that everybody's responsible for success and, of course, for 25eu8 -- for failure as well. >> i like to remind people that as brilliant as the uav drone system is, at the end of the day, there has to be someone who tells it where to fly which in many cases, not all cases, is usually a human source. in the hunt for zarqawi, it's clear that the debriefing of a detainee was vitally important to the outcome. and we know from certain movies floating around now that detainee interrogation is a very important issue. and, of course, that raises the question of how you interrogate detainees. in the book you are about as clear as anyone i've ever seen. you say torture is, quote, self-defeating. you describe the very elaborate steps you took to make sure that any detainee in your chain of command was not abused and was housed in a facility of that have, well, it wasn't a five-star hilton, but it was an appropriate facility. and at one point you said to your troops that anyone who was involved in detainee abuse would be court-martialed and expels from the task force. expelled from the task force. why did
at the e.u. level. we have been for investigation for it almost two years by the commissioner there and his staff. during this period, they comment from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we are busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have the conversation and 're sort of now waiting on with a they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth and they have announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different if the way it's applied. in our indication, the government to have the federal trade commission look at this and a similar investigation is underway. there were a sers of hearings. i testified at the hearings and, again, i don't see the consumer arm under section 2 and we have asked the government to come back and give us the examples of things which are violations of law. we haven't seen that yet we are also in negotiations with them. that's probably all i should y. what i would say is we talk to these people a lot. we're waiting on them at some level. the ideal scenarioou
enlarging the stability in europe itself by enlarging our institution, the eu or nato. what's happened to that agenda? is a no longer a part of the democratic countries? and if the answer is was so care about -- are whether georgia can become more stable, how do we get smarter about it? it isn't obvious our institutions hold the same if you used to hold five or six years ago. it isn't obvious that comes like ukraine had to stay democratizing instinct, the country of central europe had 10 years ago. so what, if anything, would you do different to make sure part of your democratic in state? >> i'd like to say quickly, i think some countries have taken a bit of an appetite suppressant when he came to their ambitions of being part of the european union, for example. >> but they are democratic. >> but they are democratic. but there also has to be benefit that flows. i think that is very much a part of the typos as to whether people are going to pursue being part of a larger union, being part of an obsession like nato. there has to be some apparent benefit in so doing. you know, the ability
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)